THE PRINCIPLES OF CHESS - A Lecture Louis Zollner

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Published: December 22nd 2010

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THE PRINCIPLES OF CHESS - A Lecture  by  Louis Zollner

THE PRINCIPLES OF CHESS - A Lecture by Louis Zollner
December 22nd 2010 | Nook | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, ZIP | 0 pages | ISBN: | 6.73 Mb

Scanned, proofed and corrected from the original edition for your reading pleasure. (Worth every penny!)***An excerpt from the beginning of the lecture:I DO not intend to say anything upon Chess History, but simply to give you some of my experiences,MoreScanned, proofed and corrected from the original edition for your reading pleasure.

(Worth every penny!)***An excerpt from the beginning of the lecture:I DO not intend to say anything upon Chess History, but simply to give you some of my experiences, which extend over something like twenty years— there may be a few things in what I am going to say which will be useful to some of you.Before touching upon the specific pieces, I shall make a few remarks upon the general terms and rules of the game. First of all, I may say that there is one very prevalent opinion about Chess, which is, that to play Chess well you must play a lot of Chess.

Now I think that is a great mistake. It does not depend so much upon the quantity of Chess you play as, I would say, upon the quality, and whatever you do play, that you play it well and give your mind to it thoroughly. In saying play it well, that brings me on to another thing. It is very pleasant to have a skittle game, but I do not think that that tends in any way to strengthen the Chess-playing power. It is very amusing, but I should strongly advise all players to play at an uniform and steady pace.

I would not recommend slow play by any means- that is as bad as skittling, or even worse, but there is a happy medium which it would be well to follow. If I were going to give you advice, I should say: Dont hover with your hand over the board, but analyze your game and your position very carefully, and when your mind is made up, make your move firmly and unhesitatingly. It gives a certainty and a stability to your play which you do not appreciate until you have for some time practiced that good habit.

Besides, that hesitation and wavering is not at all pleasant for yourself, and it is most unpleasant to your opponent- it keeps him in a constant state of nervousness. Keeping your opponent in a nervous state you might think would help to beat him- but to an opponent you must always be as courteous, as obliging and as agreeable as possible. The only thing in which you should be disagreeable is the move you make quietly on the board.

It is there that he must feel the disagreeableness of the situation.I would also recommend you very specially to keep your nerve and play coolly. For instance, at the Glasgow match, we had several games in hand that were lost through nervousness. The players got into a nervous and excited state, as it were, and lost their heads. Now it requires you to keep your nerves well in touch. That is a great point, and especially so under difficult circumstances. It is then that you require the coolness most.



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